Search

Neighbourhood Street Pattern, Socioeconomic Status and Sleep

Updated: Jul 1

Results from “Associations between neighbourhood street pattern, neighbourhood socioeconomic status and sleep in adults”

Lukic R, Olstad DL, Doyle-Baker PK, Potestio ML, McCormack GR

Neighbourhood Street Pattern, Socioeconomic Status & Sleep

Sleep duration can be a risk factor for poor health outcomes. The United States National Sleep Foundation suggests that sleeping approximately seven to nine hours per day is associated with better health and a higher quality of life for adults (1). Despite the recognized importance of sleep, many adults in Canada report sleeping less than seven hours per night (2). Evidence suggests that sleep may be affected by neighbourhood characteristics such as street layout and walkability, as well as neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES) (3, 4). Although this evidence suggests that neighbourhood characteristics may affect sleep duration among adults, the effects of neighbourhood built environment and SES have not yet been studied. A recent study examined the combined effects of the neighbourhood built environment and SES on sleep duration.


Combined Effects of Neighbourhood Built Environment & SES on Sleep A random sample of 10,500 households were selected from twelve Calgary, Alberta, Canada neighbourhoods to participate in the self-administered Physical Activity, Health and Demographic Questionnaire (PAHDQ). Findings from this study indicated no independent association between the neighbourhood built environment and sleep, nor between neighbourhood SES and sleep. However, the interaction between neighbourhood built environment and SES was associated with shorter mean sleep duration. Adults living in curvilinear low SES neighbourhoods slept the least (mean = 6.93 hours per day) while those living in curvilinear high SES neighbourhoods slept the most (mean = 7.43 hours per day). The findings suggest that the street layout (network) may be a more important factor associated with sleep duration among low versus higher SES neighbourhoods. More research is needed to better understand how the interaction between the neighbourhood built environment and neighbourhood SES may influence sleep duration in adults.


Suggested Citation: Lukic R, Olstad DL, Doyle-Baker PK, Potestio ML, McCormack GR. Associations between neighbourhood street pattern, neighbourhood socioeconomic status and sleep in adults. Prev Med Rep. 2021; 22: 101345. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2021.101345


Written by Calli Naish, BAS and Dalia Ghoneim, MPH, CSEP-CEP; Graphic by Calli Naish


Posted on June 21, 2021

References:

  1. Hirshkowitz, M, Whiton, K, Albert, SM, Alessi, C, Bruni, O, DonCarlos, L, et al. National Sleep Foundation’s updated sleep duration recommendations. Sleep Health. 2015; 1(4): 233–243.

  2. Chaput, J-P, Wong, SL, Michaud, I. Duration and quality of sleep among Canadians aged 18 to 79. Health Rep. 2017; 28 (9): 28–33.

  3. Hale, L, Hill, TD, Friedman, E, Javier Nieto, F, Galvao, LW, Engelman, CD, Malecki, KMC, Peppard, E. Perceived neighborhood quality, sleep quality, and health status: evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin. Soc. Sci. Med. 2013; 79: 16–22.

  4. Johnson, DA, Hirsch, JA, Moore, KA, Redline, S, Diez Roux, AV. Associations between the built environment and objective measures of sleep: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Am. J. Epidemiol. 2018; 187 (5): 941–950.

  5. McCormack, G.R, Friedenreich, C, McLaren, L, Potestio, M, Sandalack, B, Csizmadi, I. Interactions between neighbourhood urban form and socioeconomic status and their associations with anthropometric measurements in canadian adults. J. Environ. Publ. Health 2017; 1–10.

  6. McInerney, M, Csizmadi, I, Friedenreich, CM, Uribe, FA, Nettel-Aguirre, A, McLaren, L, Potestio, M, Sandalack, B, McCormack, GR. Associations between the neighbourhood food environment, neighbourhood socioeconomic status, and diet quality: an observational study. BMC Publ. Health 2016;16 (1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-3631-7